Away with the Fairies: Beinn an t-Sidhein

Beinn an t-Sidhein (pronounced Ben Shee-han) rises above the attractive village of Strathyre, in the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park.

It is thought that Strathyre means ‘twisting valley’ and certainly the River Balvag winds its way through Strathyre’s tight confines.

Beinn an t-Sidhein
Strathyre from Beinn an t-Sidhein

It was part of the main droving route between the Highlands and Lowlands during the 17th century while Strathyre village became a popular tourist destination with the arrival of the Callander to Oban railway in the 1870’s.

The poet Duguld Buchanan was born in Strathyre in 1716. He helped the Reverend James Stewart of Killin translate the New Testament into Scottish Gaelic and wrote an important collection of Gaelic religious poems. A monument dedicated to Buchanan stands in the village.

Folklore is prevalent in many mountain names, including Beinn an t-Sidhein, which means Fairy Mountain.

Robert Kirk, who was born in 1644 near Strathyre, in Aberfoyle, documented many of these stories during his life. However it wasn’t until 1815 (over 120 years after his death) that Sir Walter Scott published Kirk’s work in a book called The Secret Commonwealth. It is still in print today.

A good path climbs steeply through Strathyre Forest onto open hillside where there are striking views of Loch Lubnaig. It is approximately 3½ miles long and is thought to translate from Gaelic as Loch of the Bend. The Corbett of Ben Ledi rises steeply from its southern edge.

After negotiating a boggier stretch of path the top of An t-Sidhein is attained.

At 546-metres An t-Sidhein grants a breathtaking view. The rounded shape of Beinn an t-Sidhein rises a little to the north, with Strathyre and the River Balvag, hemmed in by steep hillside, drawing the eye to Loch Earn and the huge bulk of Ben Lawers. However it is the view east to Ben Vorlich and Stuc a Chroin and west to the long line of jagged Crianlarich Munro’s that really catches the eye.

An t-Sidhein
Ben Vorlich, Stuc a Chroin and Beinn Each from An t-Sidhein

The path then extends across rougher, heather clad moorland onto Beinn an t-Sidhein 562-metre summit and an incredible panorama across a mountainous landscape.

The lonely landscape of Glen Buckie sits way below Beinn an t-Sidhein while beyond Stob Binnein, Ben More, Cruach Ardrain and Beinn Tulaichean, above Crianlarich, take centre stage.

Beinn an t-Sidhein
The Crianlarich Mountains and Glen Buckie from Beinn an t-Sidhein
Advertisements

#Beinn Dubh – The Black Hill of #Luss

Sitting near the craggy Arrochar Alps and overlooked by the ever-popular Munro of Ben Lomond, the Luss Hills that rise above Loch Lomond’s western shore are vastly underrated and grant superb walking with wonderful far-reaching views.

Ben Lomond and Loch Lomond from Beinn Dubh
Ben Lomond and Loch Lomond from Beinn Dubh

Bounded by Glen Fruin in the south and Glen Douglas to the north this lovely range of hills reaches its high point of 713 metres on Beinn Chaorach. Glen Luss strikes through the heart of the Luss Hills and when up high the ruggedness of the upland topography, scored with deep v-shaped passes, wouldn’t look out of place in the Lake District. The name Luss, from the Gaelic ‘lus’, means herb.

Clan Colquhoun has held lands in and around Luss since the 1300’s and during the 16th century the family stayed in Rossdhu Castle (now a ruin) on the banks of Loch Lomond. The most infamous episode in the clan’s history happened in 1603 when they met neighbouring Clan MacGregor in Glen Fruin where a bloody battle left the Colquhoun’s with 140 of their clan dead.

Beinn Dubh makes for a fabulous ½ days hillwalk. In general good paths line the walk, which can be steep at times, and as the 642-metre top is approached the ground underfoot becomes a little rougher.

Glen Luss and the Luss Hills
Glen Luss and the Luss Hills

Having left the attractive confines of Luss village it does not take long to gain height. As you climb up Beinn Dubh’s southeastern shoulder a fabulous view across Glen Luss to Coille-eughainn Hill, Beinn Chaorach and Beinn Eich opens out while it is worth looking back for a wonderful view across Loch Lomond, its many islands mapped out below, to Dumbarton Rock and the River Clyde. On a clear day, Tinto Hill, some 50 miles to the southeast, is also visible.

Loch Lomond and the Arrochar Alps from Beinn Dubh
Loch Lomond and the Arrochar Alps from Beinn Dubh

Just beyond the summit cairn the full panorama is complete with a breathtaking view of the Arrochar Alps (Beinn Narnain and the Cobbler in particular), big Munro’s such as Beinn Chabhair and An Caisteal above Crianlarich and a great outlook north along Loch Lomond to Ben Lomond.