#Beinn Dubh – The Black Hill of #Luss

Sitting near the craggy Arrochar Alps and overlooked by the ever-popular Munro of Ben Lomond, the Luss Hills that rise above Loch Lomond’s western shore are vastly underrated and grant superb walking with wonderful far-reaching views.

Ben Lomond and Loch Lomond from Beinn Dubh
Ben Lomond and Loch Lomond from Beinn Dubh

Bounded by Glen Fruin in the south and Glen Douglas to the north this lovely range of hills reaches its high point of 713 metres on Beinn Chaorach. Glen Luss strikes through the heart of the Luss Hills and when up high the ruggedness of the upland topography, scored with deep v-shaped passes, wouldn’t look out of place in the Lake District. The name Luss, from the Gaelic ‘lus’, means herb.

Clan Colquhoun has held lands in and around Luss since the 1300’s and during the 16th century the family stayed in Rossdhu Castle (now a ruin) on the banks of Loch Lomond. The most infamous episode in the clan’s history happened in 1603 when they met neighbouring Clan MacGregor in Glen Fruin where a bloody battle left the Colquhoun’s with 140 of their clan dead.

Beinn Dubh makes for a fabulous ½ days hillwalk. In general good paths line the walk, which can be steep at times, and as the 642-metre top is approached the ground underfoot becomes a little rougher.

Glen Luss and the Luss Hills
Glen Luss and the Luss Hills

Having left the attractive confines of Luss village it does not take long to gain height. As you climb up Beinn Dubh’s southeastern shoulder a fabulous view across Glen Luss to Coille-eughainn Hill, Beinn Chaorach and Beinn Eich opens out while it is worth looking back for a wonderful view across Loch Lomond, its many islands mapped out below, to Dumbarton Rock and the River Clyde. On a clear day, Tinto Hill, some 50 miles to the southeast, is also visible.

Loch Lomond and the Arrochar Alps from Beinn Dubh
Loch Lomond and the Arrochar Alps from Beinn Dubh

Just beyond the summit cairn the full panorama is complete with a breathtaking view of the Arrochar Alps (Beinn Narnain and the Cobbler in particular), big Munro’s such as Beinn Chabhair and An Caisteal above Crianlarich and a great outlook north along Loch Lomond to Ben Lomond.

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Focus On: North #Argyll

To see a selection of this month’s ‘Focus On’ images please click here

Mull from McCaig's Tower, Oban
Mull from McCaig’s Tower, Oban

Sitting with the boundaries of North Argyll is a spectacular portion of Scotland’s renowned west coast (including several beautiful and easily accessible islands), scenic countryside, wildlife rich woodland, forestry and gardens, several iconic hills and mountains, and a litany of beautiful lochs and rivers. The biggest conurbation is the bustling fishing port of Oban, where many of the iconic Caledonian MacBrayne ferries that service the islands sitting off the Argyll coast are caught. Oban is also a fine place for a wander.

Add to this the Crinan Canal, described as the most beautiful short cut in Scotland, a truly exceptional array of flora and fauna and some of the most important historical sites in Scotland and you have a beautiful and fascinating walking destination.

Argyll means ‘Coastland of the Gaels’, referring to the early Gaelic speaking Scots, who populated much of Scotland’s western seaboard. It was where Irish settlers, known as the Scotti, arrived in the 6th century AD, and these people eventually gave their name to Scotland.

300 years later and the Gaels of Dál Riata amalgamated with the Picts of eastern Scotland and established the kingdom of Alba, after which the control and influence of Dunadd rapidly weakened.

The Argyll landscape and its relationship with human beings were inextricably entwined even before the Scotti arrived. Kilmartin Glen, near Lochgilphead, contains several burial cairns and standing stones constructed around 4-5000 years while the rock carvings at nearby Achnabreac are believed to date from the same time.

Furthermore Castle Dounie, near Crinan, and Dun a Cuaiche, above Inveraray, hold the remains of Iron Age forts. More recently the landscape has been moulded by humans for the benefit of agriculture, fuel, timber and tourism.

The landscape of North Argyll has many facets; great muscular mountains like Ben Cruachan, low-lying agricultural plains along its centre and little islands cast adrift from the mainland yet only requiring a short ferry journey into a more peaceful, timeless backdrop.

The elongated sea lochs of Etive, Fyne and Linnhe bite into the coastline while their freshwater cousins, including Loch Awe and Loch Avich, puncture huge swathes of forest and woodland.

Loch Fyne, Inveraray
Loch Fyne, Inveraray

North Argyll is also home to some of the finest remnants of the renowned oak woods that used to cloak much of Europe’s Atlantic seaboard. Superb examples can be found at Crinan, Dalavich and Glen Nant. The history of these woods date back some 9000 years when oak, along with birch, elm and hazel, began to colonise this rough, rocky setting, aided in no small part by a warm, moist climate.

It is a landscape full of wildlife; dipper, kingfisher, pied flycatcher, redstart, woodpeckers, red squirrel, guillemot, tern, redshank, ringed plover, turnstone, golden and white-tailed sea eagle, lichens, mosses, bluebells and orchids just a tiny proportion of what may be seen.

Therefore, wherever you are in North Argyll you travel through history, making walking here an intriguing, enthralling and beautiful prospect.

Loch Etive from Ben Cruachan
Loch Etive from Ben Cruachan

Some Winter Walking for the Holidays

For more information about Keith and Scottish Horizons please visit scottishhorizons.co.uk or @outdoorfergie

With the excess of the Christmas season approaching here are 10 simple and energetic walks, where you can remove yourself from the hustle and bustle or work off that extra portion of Christmas pudding.

St Abbs to Coldingham Sands: Unbeknownst to many, the Scottish Borders has a small, but magnificent section of coastline stretching fifteen miles from St Abbs to Berwick. Whilst this can be walked in one long day, the couple of miles between St Abbs and Coldingham Sands makes for an easy walk with a fantastic beach to enjoy. From St Abbs Harbour car park, steps lead up to Murrayfield, which turns southeast to join the Berwickshire Coastal Path. It is then simply a matter of following the path down into Coldingham Sands to enjoy the beautiful beach where its distinctive beach huts still survive. It is worth continuing south along the sands for a few hundred yards to Milldown Point and capture the superb view back to St Abbs. To return to St Abbs a short walk heads into Coldingham from where the B6438 can be followed northeast for a short distance to reach the path of Creel Road, which continues back into St Abbs. OS Landranger 67 Start/Finish GR NT919674.

St Abbs from Coldingham
St Abbs from Coldingham

Greenock Cut, Inverclyde: Greenock Cut is a magnificent walk of around seven miles above Greenock, utilising the 19th century paths and tracks near to Loch Thom that were built to supply fresh water for the residents of Greenock, Gourock, and Port Glasgow. The wildlife here is superb and the views breathtaking. From Greenock Cut Visitor Centre car park turn right onto a single-track road where the road immediately splits. Take the centre path and follow this past Shielhall Farm. An excellent path continues high above the River Clyde, passing some of the workers huts that were built during the construction of Greenock Cut. At Overton turn right and follow a broad track to a fork. Here keep right from where it rises high above Greenock and the Clyde Estuary. Go left when the track splits again and descend past Loch Thom and then back to the visitor centre. OS Landranger Map 63 Start/Finish GR NS247721.

The River Clyde from Greenock Cut
The River Clyde from Greenock Cut

Cathkin Braes, Glasgow: Cathkin Braes Country Park stands at the very edge of Glasgow and comprises of lovely woodland (home to roe deer and woodpecker) as well as bestowing possibly the finest view of the city. Beginning at the large car park on Cathkin Road a good path heads northeast into mixed woodland. It soon exits the woodland and swings left to run along the lip of a steep slope to reach Queen Mary’s Seat (supposedly where Mary Stuart watched the Battle of Langside). This is the highest point of Glasgow and consequently the panorama across the city to the Campsie Fells and the Southern Highlands is truly spectacular. From here turn 180° and make your way back into woodland. A right turn onto a path continues west into the Big Wood, eventually exiting at its western corner. Here make a right and follow a good path back to the start. OS Landranger 64 Start/Finish Grid Reference NS 619579.

Glasgow from Cathkin Braes
Glasgow from Cathkin Braes

Arthur’s Seat and Salisbury Crags, Edinburgh: Holyrood Park in Edinburgh has a multitude of great walks but perhaps the best is the climb onto Arthur’s Seat via the glorious Salisbury Crags. Good paths lead across this historic setting where the views are astonishing. Beginning outside the Scottish Parliament the pavement leads into Holyrood Park. Turning right it then merges with a grassy path, leading underneath Salisbury Crags to reach its base. A wonderful path then climbs along the edge of the crags where the views of Edinburgh Castle and the Firth of Forth are remarkable. Descend towards St Margaret’s Loch before climbing steeply all the way to the compact summit of Arthur’s Seat. Again the views across Edinburgh and along the coast are breathtaking. A steep descent heads down to Dunsapie Loch at Queen’s Drive, where a left turn heads back to the start. OS Landranger Map 66 Start/Finish NT 268739.

Edinburgh from Arthur's Seat
Edinburgh from Arthur’s Seat

North Berwick and North Berwick Law, East Lothian: Coastal walking is fantastic during the winter months where strong winds can add to the walk rather than be a hindrance, and the beaches of North Berwick are wonderful for walking. Yellow Craig, a short distance west of North Berwick is a good place to start, in full view of Fidra; Robert Louis Stevenson is thought to have based Treasure Island on Fidra. It is an easy walk across the soft sands towards North Berwick and its harbour. A visit to the Seabird Centre is recommended before walking south along the B1347 to the base of North Berwick Law. A track traverses around the hill and it is only a short (yet sharp) ascent to her summit. Although less than 200 metres in height the views are incredible to Bass Rock, the Firth of Forth and the long ridge of The Pentlands. Retrace steps back to the start. OS Landranger Map 66 Start/Finish GR NT517855.

Bass Rock and North Berwick Law
Bass Rock and North Berwick Law

Cairnbaan to Crinan, Argyll & Bute: There can’t be many better ways to spend a few hours over the festive period than strolling along the towpath of the Crinan Canal, enjoying the rich variety of wildlife and lovely views. Cairnbaan lies only a few miles from Lochgilphead and is the start point of the route. The locks here are still manually operated and it is great to help out when opening and closing them. A towpath follows the line of the canal for five miles into Crinan and as little or as much time can be taken to walk along this wonderful section of Argyll. At Crinan the view stretching across Loch Crinan and the Sound of Jura to Mull’s jumble of peaks is one of the best in Scotland. From Crinan it is a simple matter of retracing steps along the towpath, enjoying the scenery, wildlife, and peace and quiet all over again, back to Cairnbaan. OS Landranger Map 55 Start/Finish GR NR908840.

Crinan
Crinan

Kerrera, Argyll & Bute: The island of Kerrera, lying a short distance from Oban, is a wonderful, unspoilt place. A walk around Kerrera takes a couple of hours but such is the extent of historical interest and superb views then a whole day can be spent exploring this gorgeous little island. A short ferry ride takes you back in time and onto a beautiful, tranquil location. My own favoured route is to follow the track southwest from the ferry passing beautiful Horseshoe Bay and towards the dramatic and historic ruins of Gylen Castle. The track then a path continues along the quieter west shore from where there is a magnificent view of Mull. After Barn-nam-Boc Bay a stiff climb leads to an amazing viewpoint. The vista is simply astonishing, encompassing the delights of Oban, the Lorn Coast and the great sentinel of Ben Cruachan. An easy descent returns to the ferry. OS Landranger Map 49 Start/Finish GR NM830287.

Ben Cruachan from Kerrera
Ben Cruachan from Kerrera

Loch an Eilean, Badenoch & Speyside: For many the high arctic plateau of the Cairngorms will be out of bounds during the winter months, such is the severity of weather that can persist during the season. Fortunately there is a wealth of low level walks to enjoy and a circuit of gorgeous Loch an Eilein is one of the best. The walk is only about three miles in length but it travels through the magnificent Rothiemurchus Forest, home to a myriad of wildlife, and also past the ancient remains of Loch an Eilein castle, which dates from the 14th century. It was once home to Alexander Stewart, better known as the notorious Wolf of Badenoch, who ransacked and burned, amongst others, the towns of Forres and Elgin, including its cathedral. Today the walk offers solitude and from the visitor centre a path circumnavigates the loch granting superb views of the wild and windswept Cairngorm Mountains. OS Landranger Map 36 Start/Finish GR NN897087.

Loch an Eilein
Loch an Eilein

Craigellachie, Aviemore, Badenoch & Speyside: Craigellachie Nature Reserve is home to stunning birch woodland and amazing wildlife including Scottish crossbill, wood warbler, lesser redpoll, orange tip, scotch argus, butterflies and the rare Kentish Glory moth. From Aviemore Railway Station turn left, walk along Grampian Road and turn right onto a road for Craigellachie Nature Reserve. Walk by a youth hostel then descend into the reserve. The path climbs gently into gorgeous birch woodland. Go right at a fork to reach Loch Pulardden. Bear left, follow the path around the loch then veer left to a junction, turn right and continue to a path on the left. Follow this to a waymark, turn right continue to the second birch pool. Bear right at the next waymark, then walk around the loch to a junction. Go left onto a stony path then take the first left where a narrow path descends through the woodland, eventually reaching a junction. Make a right, drop down a path to another junction near Loch Pulardden. Bear right, walk back down to the outward-bound path and retrace steps back into Aviemore. OS Landranger Map 36 Start/Finish GR NN896123.

Craigellachie Birch Pool
Craigellachie Birch Pool

Findhorn, Moray: Findhorn, sitting on Scotland’s north-east coast, is a beautiful, unspoilt village with a gorgeous sandy beach, lovely dunes and some fantastic views towards the mountains of Caithness. This walk is really a stroll around the village and onto its beach, which is guaranteed to relieve stress levels and blow away the festive cobwebs. The walk can be extended if you wish as you can walk the beach all the way to Burghead. At the entrance to the village a road runs northwest along Findhorn Bay passing the Royal Findhorn Yacht Club. At a boatyard turn left down onto the beach and walk along the lovely sand to reach the dunes. Walk over the dunes that in turn lead onto a beautiful stony beach looking over Burghead Bay. Turn right and enjoy this unblemished corner of Scotland. About a mile along the beach turn right from it into a car park and here quiet roads lead back into the village. OS Landranger Map 27 Start/Finish GR NJ039643.

Findhorn Bay
Findhorn Bay

 

 

#Lismore – Gardener’s World

Lismore is an idyllic island that stands out on Loch Linnhe and a short distance across the Lynn of Lorn from Port Appin in Argyll.

A short passenger ferry journey (bikes are also allowed) transports you onto the island at Point and into a more peaceful, laid-back world. Achnachroish (where the Oban car ferry docks) and the idyllic Port Ramsey are the island’s main settlements and much of its history can be discovered in the superb Lismore Heritage Centre.

Lismore’s name derives from the Gaelic lios-mor, meaning ‘the great garden’ and its fertile landscape is due to its Dalradian limestone geology, which has helped nurture an abundance of wildflowers including primrose, bluebell, wood sorrel, dog violet, purple and common spotted orchid, silverweed, tormentil and meadowsweet. Hen harrier, buzzard, dunlin, oystercatcher, shags, guillemots and migrating common and arctic terns is a selection of birdlife.

There is also a very good chance of spotting golden eagle and white-tailed sea eagle when on Lismore as it lies under what is thought to be an eagle ‘highway’, one that travels from Mull in the west to the Tay Estuary in the east near Dundee. Successful introduction of both species has taken place in both locations in recent years.

Lismore’s industrial history lies firmly in its limestone quarrying. Much of it took place at Salean, on the island’s north coast, and the remains of this small, industrial centre can still be seen here. The stone was quarried and shipped out on locally owned smacks (a traditional fishing boat) for agriculture and building mortar between 1826 and the 1930’s.

Many of the buildings date from early days of the quarry, including a manager’s office, workers cottages, a shop and a cottage on the pier. It is a very atmospheric, evocative spot, hemmed in on its southern side by the quarry and with some lovely sea views.

Port Ramsey Bay, Lismore
Port Ramsey Bay, Lismore