Southern Comfort

The Mull of Galloway is the general term applied to Scotland’s southernmost point but the defined point is actually the Gallie Craig, a rocky promontory which lies a little west of the Mull of Galloway Lighthouse (the Gallie Craig is also the name of the excellent coffee shop which is at the start of the walk).

The Mull of Galloway Lighthouse was built by Robert Stevenson (of the famous Lighthouse Stevenson family) who also built nearby Corsewall Lighthouse. Work commenced in 1828 and was completed in 1830. Standing 26m high means the light itself is 99m (325 feet) above sea level and on a clear night can be seen from 28 miles away. The Mull of Galloway Lighthouse is open to the public and there is a superb visitor centre lying adjacent to the lighthouse.

The coastline here is incredibly rugged with the beautifully coloured cliffs rising steeply to over 200 feet and providing outstanding views. The Mull of Galloway is an RSPB nature reserve and, as you would expect, the wildlife is superb; from tiny lichens that cling to the cliffs to basking sharks (the world’s second largest fish) that swim in the seas as well as puffins, fulmars, shags, razorbills, guillemots, wall brown and grayling butterflies, all thriving in the warmer climate that the gulf-stream air provides.

 

An exceptional walk of around 3 miles leaves from the lighthouse and runs north along the coast with near vertical drops plunging to the ragged coastline below. At West Tarbet the path then crosses to East Tarbet and then heads back along the cliffs to the lighthouse. Breathtaking views to the Isle of Man, Northern Ireland and the gorgeous Galloway coast are all on show.

The walk is detailed in my guidebook to the Galloway Coast, which is published by Catkin Press. Click here for details.

The Galloway Coastline from the Mull of Galloway
The Galloway Coastline from the Mull of Galloway
Mull of Galloway and the Mull of Galloway lighthouse
Mull of Galloway and the Mull of Galloway lighthouse

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s